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Psoriatic Arthritis

About five percent of patients with psoriasis, a scaly skin disorder, develop psoriatic arthritis. This type of arthritis causes painful joint inflammation, mainly in the toes and fingers, and occasionally other joints like the wrists and the knees. Psoriatic arthritis may affect the fingernails and toenails, leaving them pitted and discolored. It is also a factor in conjunctivitis, an eye inflammation disease.

Though generally mild, psoriatic arthritis can in a few cases cause severe pain, discomfort and disability. Researchers are unsure of its cause, but do believe there is a genetic connection. Individuals with psoriasis tend to have higher instances of arthritis than the rest of the population.

Common Treatments:

Although psoriatic arthritis can't be prevented, it can be controlled and its effects slowed with a proper medication strategy, physical therapy, exercise and other lifestyle changes.

Physicians usually prescribe non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like aspirin or ibuprofen to alleviate pain and swelling, especially in milder cases. In more severe cases, some patients respond better to prescription forms of anti-inflammatory drugs.
      Other Conditions
Ankylosing Spondylitis
Back Pain
Bursitis
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Fibromyalgia
Gout
Infectious arthritis
Lupus
Lyme Disease
Myositis
Osteoarthritis
Osteonecrosis
Polymyalgia rheumatica
Psoriatic Arthritis
Reactive Arthritis
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Sarcoidosis
Scleroderma
Sjögren's Syndrome
Spurs