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Sarcoidosis

Sarcoidosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that in some forms may last only a few months, while in other forms may last a lifetime.

While the underlying cause of the disease is unknown, its mechanisms are well-documented. Small rounded outgrowths of blood vessels or connective tissue called granulomas develop in inflamed tissues. These granulomas usually represent an autoimmune response by the body to some foreign substance or condition, and can form in many major organs as well as lymph nodes, bone marrow and joints.

Individuals with sarcoidosis can experience fever, skin rash or eye swelling. Sarcoidosis is also associated with arthritis and some muscle diseases.

Common Treatments:

In most people, sarcoidosis disappears quickly and requires no extensive treatment. For more long-term instances, physicians normally prescribe glucocorticoids (steroid hormones like cortisone, prednisone or hydrocortisone) as the main mode of treatment, along with physical therapy.

Physicians may also prescribe non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), salicylates, colchicines and hydroxychloroquine. Methotrexate, azathioprine and cyclosporine are currently being tested for use with sarcoidosis patients.
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Infectious arthritis
Lupus
Lyme Disease
Myositis
Osteoarthritis
Osteonecrosis
Polymyalgia rheumatica
Psoriatic Arthritis
Reactive Arthritis
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Sarcoidosis
Scleroderma
Sjögren's Syndrome
Spurs